“You get to take Latin!”: On the Benefits of Classical Studies

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The Art of Teaching: A Conference for Teaching Men


November 9-11 • The Heights School, Potomac, MD

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The Heights requires its students to study Latin. Why? Is it from a love of the old? Are we simply fascinated by antiquity? To the contrary, there are excellent practical and existential reasons for classical studies. The benefits we seek in language study generally are found to be more powerful within the particular study of Latin. Moreover, speaking the language of the ancients allows us to communicate with them.  This bears fruit in our capacity to know the truth, and our ability to serve the polity through well-informed and practical citizenship. Listen in to hear Mr. Myers and Dr. Yaceczko discuss why your sons will spend at least three of their years here learning a language that can help us be fully alive.

Lionel Yaceczko

About the guest:

Lionel Yaceczko


Dr. Yaceczko has taught regular and online courses to all ages at the primary, secondary, and postsecondary levels, as well as summer programs for inner city boys in Chicago and Washington, D.C. Lionel’s research is focused on Late Antiquity (ca AD 180-800), with a doctoral dissertation on education in the later Roman Empire. His articles have been published in Studies in Late Antiquity, The Medieval Review, Crisis Magazine, HeightsForum.org, and Cavalcade. He has also worked in academic publishing. Lionel lives in Laurel with his wife Janet (another Latinist) and children Stanislaus, Sarah, Thom, Lio and Diego.

Justin Myers

About the guest:

Justin Myers


Teaching at The Heights since 2002, Justin Myers has lived in the Washington area nearly all his life. He attended Holy Redeemer School in Kensington, Maryland, and Georgetown Prep. He earned a B.A. in classics and psychology from Boston College and an M.A. in Latin at the University of Maryland. Prior to coming to The Heights, Justin taught at St. Hugh’s School and DeMatha High School. In addition to his classics responsibilities this year, he continues as the head coach of the cross-country and track team. He currently lives in Olney with his wife, Meredith, and his three children.